Acorn Squash Custard (paleo, GAPS)

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Our family loves this custard! (Paleo, GAPS)

Yesterday I wrote about an easy way to make acorn squash. Well, next time you make some, make double, and use the rest to make this acorn squash custard! I made this for my 7 year old’s birthday, and we all loved it.

This simple and delicious custard is gluten free, paleo, GAPS legal, as well as being refined sugar free, low sugar and delicious. There is even a vegan option if you would prefer to keep it 100% plant based.

It’s hard to believe you can make something so tasty that is fundamentally, made with just squash, eggs and honey.

I’ll show you how to make it. Here goes!

Acorn Squash Custard 

Acorn squash is a type of summer squash, belonging to the same family as zucchinis. It can be easily considered a pumpin, with it’s hard skin and acorn shape. There is actually no distinction between pumpkins and squashes, so you could consider it to be either.

It has a lovely dark green skin which is hard when ripe, and when cooked it has a buttery flavor which works well with both savory and sweet dishes.

Despite the name, this acorn squash custard doesn’t contain acorns OR custard. In fact, this dessert is nut free, lactose free and easily hacked to make it vegan. It is one for the whole family to enjoy!

What you need to make Acorn Squash Custard

This is such an elegant dessert, you barely need anything.

  • Acorn Squash – The primary ingredient in this acorn squash dessert is roasted acorn squash. You can learn how to bake acorn squash here – it doesn’t have to be pureed yet, you can just scoop it out of the shell.
  • Eggs – Eggs are used to bind it all together.  You could use whole eggs, or swap out the egg whites for some gelatin if you want.
  • Coconut Oil – approved on both paleo and GAPS and a great healthy oil for adding to cooking
  • Ghee – Ghee is butter that has been simmered and strained to remove all water. You can swap it for more coconut oil.
  • Cinnamon – adds a sweet and woody flavor, cinnamon is also known for lowering blood sugar.
  • Honey or maple syrup – to add some refined-sugar sweetness to the custard. Only use as much as you need.

Equipment You Need To Make Acorn Squash Custard

  • Large mixing bowl
  • Immersion blender – my favorite kitchen tool these days
  • Pie pan or large tart/quiche pan, or 9″ square glass pan

How to Make Acorn Squash Custard

This custard is very simple, really.

If you haven’t got premade acorn squash, the first thing to do is to cook that up according to these directions.

Then you are ready to go to make custard!

As with all oven cooking, you will start by preheating your oven to 350F.

If you are going to makethis custard without egg whites (we leave them out due to allergies), then first whisk together the grass-fed gelatin powder with the water in a cup, and let sit for a minute to thicken or bloom.

If you are using whole eggs, then no advance preparation is needed.

Combine all ingredients into a mixing bowl and blend well with an immersion blender. Pour into a greased pan (I use coconut oil) and smooth with a spatula.

Bake at 350 for 50-60 minutes. When a toothpick inserted comes out clean, the custard is done. Allow to cool on a cooling rack for 20 minutes.

When serving, drizzle raw honey or maple syrup over each slice. Yum!

Notes

The edges will likely brown and that’s fine.

This can be served warm, but I actually prefer it cold. It kind of reminds me of cheesecake. 🙂

This pairs very well with my “butterscotch” detox tea – which is a great coffee substitute.

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Our family loves this custard! (Paleo, GAPS)

Acorn Squash Custard (paleo, GAPS)


  • Author: Danielle @ lovelovething.com
  • Total Time: 70 min

Description

A delicious paleo, low-sugar custard perfect for the holiays or any time of the year.


Ingredients

Units Scale

Instructions

Preheat your oven to 350.

If you are going to make this custard without egg whites (we leave them out due to allergies), then first whisk together the grass-fed gelatin powder with the water in a cup, and let sit for a minute to thicken or bloom. If you are using whole eggs, then no advance preparation is needed.

Combine all ingredients into a mixing bowl and blend well with an immersion blender.

Pour into a greased pan and smooth with a spatula.

Bake at 350 for 50-60 minutes. When a toothpick inserted comes out clean, the custard is done. Allow to cool on a cooling rack for 20 minutes.

Drizzle raw honey or maple syrup over each slice. Yum!

  • Prep Time: 10 min
  • Cook Time: 60 min
  • Category: Desserts

Pin: Acorn Squash Custard

Our family loves this low-carb acorn squash custard! There's even an egg-white-free option...

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33 thoughts on “Acorn Squash Custard (paleo, GAPS)”

  1. Pingback: The Roundup
  2. i just bought my first acorn squash last week and i love the stuff! i will have to buy another so i can try this. i’ve made pumpkin custard and sweet potato custard and loved those a lot, so i’m sure this is delicious.

    for the squash, is it already baked when you put it in the blender?

    Reply
  3. just pulled this out of the oven, and it smells sooooo good! i will admit, i may have been a teensy bit jealous over my husband's Thanksgiving pumpkin pie, so i decided to give this recipe a try. what happens if i don't let it cool for a whole twenty minutes? …i guess we will find out! 😉

    Reply
  4. My husband and I love acorn squash and I think at least one of the two kids is on board with it. We are trying this recipe as one of our Thanksgiving dinner contributions. I can't wait to see what everyone thinks!

    Reply
  5. This recipe has given me an inspiring base to branch out from. The texture and flavor was great. I found a sprinkle of sea salt really brought out every bit of yum in the caramelized parts of the baked squash. Next time I plan to add a pinch of salt, homemade non-dairy milk and maybe some whipped coconut cream topping. I’m especially eager to trying this with a kabocha or kuri squash!
    Thanks!

    Reply

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